Rajandran R Telecom Engineer turned Full-time Derivative Trader. Mostly Trading Nifty, Banknifty, USDINR and High Liquid Stock Derivatives. Trading the Markets Since 2006 onwards. Using Market Profile and Orderflow for more than a decade. Designed and published 100+ open source trading systems on various trading tools. Strongly believe that market understanding and robust trading frameworks are the key to the trading success. Writing about Markets, Trading System Design, Market Sentiment, Trading Softwares & Trading Nuances since 2007 onwards. Author of Marketcalls.in and Co-Creator of Algomojo (Algorithmic Trading Platform for DIY Traders)

Stock Charts Explained

1 min read

When looking at stock charts what you see may not mean much to you. On these charts there are patterns. These patterns mean a lot to the investors that analyze such data to make their trades. There are many different indicators and no one indicator out weighs the other. However when taken into consideration relative to one another it begins to make sense. Recognizing these patters helps investors make successful predictions on future investments.

These patterns have names which helps identify their movement. There is a pattern called cup and handle. This particular pattern identifies a stock that starts high and then dips and comes back up again.

Another pattern is called head and shoulders. This identifies a stock that peaks then dips then peaks again higher than the previous peek. Then drops and finally peaks again. This is a pattern liked by bears.

One of the most popular patters is called the moving average. The moving average is a very strong indicator. Basically what it does is identify a stocks movement over a given period of time.

Another pattern is called the Relative Strength Index. This identifies a stock as follows. It compares the number of days a stock finishes up compared how many times it finishes down.

Another pattern is called the Money Flow Index. The money flow index goes beyond the relative strength index in that it takes into account the number of shares traded as well as the price.

Then there is the Bollinger Bands. This is a chart with a grouping of three lines. The middle line is the moving average. The other two lines which are the upper and lower lines are indicating market volatility. The more volatile the market the further apart these lines go. When there is little volatility they come close together.
[wp_ad_camp_5]

 

Rajandran R Telecom Engineer turned Full-time Derivative Trader. Mostly Trading Nifty, Banknifty, USDINR and High Liquid Stock Derivatives. Trading the Markets Since 2006 onwards. Using Market Profile and Orderflow for more than a decade. Designed and published 100+ open source trading systems on various trading tools. Strongly believe that market understanding and robust trading frameworks are the key to the trading success. Writing about Markets, Trading System Design, Market Sentiment, Trading Softwares & Trading Nuances since 2007 onwards. Author of Marketcalls.in and Co-Creator of Algomojo (Algorithmic Trading Platform for DIY Traders)

[Research] Youtube Thumbnail Indicator for Contrarians

Youtube Thumbnail Indicator is a modern-day contrary indicator and alternative to magazine cover indicator as the masses are shifting the consumption of content in...
Rajandran R
1 min read

Risk Management is only for the Poors – Game…

Game Stop Corporation a brick and motor video game retailer is been in the limelight for the last few days and thanks to Robinhood...
Rajandran R
2 min read

Investors are Dumb?

Last Thursday Elon Musk (Tesla CEO) urged his Twitter followers to use Signal App instead of Whatsapp over privacy issues. Elon Musk tweeted after...
Rajandran R
1 min read

Leave a Reply

Get Notifications, Alerts on Market Updates, Trading Tools, Automation & More